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WHAT IS IT?

The OKPOP Museum, to be located in the Brady Arts District of Tulsa, will be a 75,000¬–square–foot, four story building dedicated to the creative spirit of Oklahoma's people and the influence of Oklahoma artists on popular culture around the world. The underlying theme of this innovative and interactive museum will be "Crossroads of Creativity," whether it is in the field of music, film, television, theatre, pop art, comic book, literature or humor. The museum will collect artifacts, archival materials, film and video and audio recordings that reflect Oklahoma's influence nationally and internationally.

WHO WILL BUILD IT?

The OK Pop will be built and managed by the Oklahoma Historical Society, a statewide organization that opened the Smithsonian-affiliated Oklahoma History Center five years ago. To prepare for the project, the OHS has recently sponsored exhibits on "Rock and Roll," "Jim Halsey: Starmaker," "Chester Gould and Other Okie Cartoonists," and "Pickin' and Grinnin': Roy Clark and the Legacy of Hee Haw." Hundreds of artists have offered their support and collections, ranging from the families of Bob Wills and Chester Gould to Garth Brooks and Kristin Chenoweth.

WHERE WILL IT BE LOCATED?

The Pop Museum will be built on a piece of land that currently serves as a parking lot for employees of the Bank of Oklahoma (BOK). BOK has offered to donate this block contingent on the authorization of a bond issue by the state legislature and the construction of an adjoining parking garage by the Oklahoma Historical Society. Besides serving visitors to The Pop, the parking garage would have an immediate impact on downtown Tulsa and the Brady District, which have parking shortages, and would be a source of generated revenue for the Pop Museum.

The lot is 90,000 square feet, the footprint of the museum would take up roughly 30,000 square feet, while the parking garage would be hidden by the Pop facade and would take up the remaining 60,000 square feet.

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